Tutorial by Examples



Declaring an Event You can declare an event on any class or struct using the following syntax: public class MyClass { // Declares the event for MyClass public event EventHandler MyEvent; // Raises the MyEvent event public void RaiseEvent() { OnMyEvent(); }...
Event declaration: public event EventHandler<EventArgsT> EventName; Event handler declaration: public void HandlerName(object sender, EventArgsT args) { /* Handler logic */ } Subscribing to the event: Dynamically: EventName += HandlerName; Through the Designer: Click the Events...
Event declaration: public event EventHandler<EventArgsType> EventName; Event handler declaration using lambda operator => and subscribing to the event: EventName += (obj, eventArgs) => { /* Handler logic */ }; Event handler declaration using delegate anonymous method syntax: Eve...
Events can be of any delegate type, not just EventHandler and EventHandler<T>. For example: //Declaring an event public event Action<Param1Type, Param2Type, ...> EventName; This is used similarly to standard EventHandler events: //Adding a named event handler public void HandlerNa...
Custom events usually need custom event arguments containing information about the event. For example MouseEventArgs which is used by mouse events like MouseDown or MouseUp events, contains information about Location or Buttons which used to generate the event. When creating new events, to create a...
A cancelable event can be raised by a class when it is about to perform an action that can be canceled, such as the FormClosing event of a Form. To create such event: Create a new event arg deriving from CancelEventArgs and add additional properties for event data. Create an event using EventH...
If a class raises a large the number of events, the storage cost of one field per delegate may not be acceptable. The .NET Framework provides event properties for these cases. This way you can use another data structure like EventHandlerList to store event delegates: public class SampleClass { ...

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