Getting started with angular-ui-router

Download angular-ui-router eBook

Remarks

Angular UI-Router is a client-side Single Page Application routing framework for AngularJS.

Routing frameworks for SPAs update the browser's URL as the user navigates through the app. Conversely, this allows changes to the browser's URL to drive navigation through the app, thus allowing the user to create a bookmark to a location deep within the SPA.

UI-Router applications are modeled as a hierarchical tree of states. UI-Router provides a state machine to manage the transitions between those application states in a transaction-like manner.

Taken from the UI-Router Github page

Versions

VersionRelease Date
0.2.182016-02-07
0.2.172016-01-25
0.2.162016-01-24
0.2.152016-05-19
0.2.142016-04-23
0.2.132016-11-20
0.2.122016-11-13
0.2.112016-08-26
0.2.102016-03-12
0.2.92014-01-17
0.2.82014-01-16

Basic View

index.html

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Angular-UI Router Example</title>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/angular.js/1.4.9/angular.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/angular-ui-router/0.3.1/angular-ui-router.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="../js/script.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body ui-view="mainView"> <!-- Defining a container for our view -->
    </body>
</html>
 

script.js

var app = angular.module('app', ['ui.router']);
app.config(['$stateProvider', function($stateProvider){
    $stateProvider.state('home', {                        // Creating a state called 'home'
        url: '',                                          // An empty URL means that this state will be loaded on the main URL when no other state is called
        views: {
            'mainView': {                                 // Section for our view-container that we defined in the HTML
                template: '<h1>It works!</h1>'            // Setting a template for this view
                /*templateUrl: '../templates/home.html'*/ //templateUrl would load the file and uses it's content as the template
             }
        }
    });
}])
 

Defining a state with multiple view

In ui-router a state can hold multiple views, each with his own controller and a template

.state('dashboard', {
     name: 'dashboard',
     url: '/dashboard',
     views: {
         "view1": {
             templateUrl: "path/to/view1.html",
             controller: "view1Controller"
         },
         "view2": {
             templateUrl: "path/to/view2.html",
             controller: "view2Controller"
         }
     }
 })
 

Then inside your state's HTML, you can link these views

<div ui-view="view1"></div>
<div ui-view="view2"></div>
 

Hello World Example

STEP 1: Installation

Before you can use Angular-UI Router you must include AngularJS itself in your project. For a detailed guide on that see this documentation.

You can download Angular-UI Router either from their GitHub-Page or from NuGet, NPM, Bower respectively.

After you have included the JS file in your webpage you can inject the ui.router module inside your application. In your script file you should have something like this:

var app = angular.module('app', []);
 

and now we are going to inject Angular-UI Router into our own application like this:

var app = angular.module('app', ['ui.router']);
 

Now Angular-UI Router will be loaded with our application. The following steps will explain the basics behind Angular-UI Router and will show some of the basic functionality.


STEP 2: Defining simple states

You can configure the UI-Router inside the Angular config function. Use the $stateProvider to define your states. In the following example, each state has a url, controller and a template.

(function() {
  var app = angular.module('app', ['ui.router']);
  
  app.config(['$stateProvider', function($stateProvider) {
      $stateProvider
        .state('home', {
          url: "/home",
          templateUrl: "home.html",
          controller: "homeCtrl"
        })
        .state('kitchen', {
          url: "/kitchen",
          templateUrl: "kitchen.html",
          controller: "kitchenCtrl"
        })
        .state('den', {
          url: "/denCtrl",
          templateUrl: "den.html",
          controller: "denCtrl"
        })
        .state('itemDetail', {
          url: "/items/:itemName",
          templateUrl: "item.html",
          controller: "itemDetailCtrl"
        })

    }])
})();
 

in your HTML, you will need the ui-view directive so that the state views can be populated inside.

<div ui-view></div>
 

STEP 3: Accessing states

There are all together 3 ways to access a state that is defined in $stateProvider .

1. Via ui-sref directive

You can access states inside your HTML, by using the ui-sref directive

<li ui-sref-active="active">
    <a ui-sref="kitchen">Go to the Kitchen</a>
</li>
<li ui-sref-active="active">
    <a ui-sref="den">Enter the den</a>
</li>
<li ui-sref-active="active">
    <a ui-sref="itemDetail({itemName:'keyboard'})">Key Board</a>
</li>
 

2. Via $state service in the controller

you can also navigate to other states inside your controller by using the $state provided to the controller with the .go method.

.controller(function($scope, $state) {
    // ...
    $scope.navigateTo = function(stateName) {
        $state.go(stateName); // i.e. $state.go('den'); 
    };
})
 

3. Via the url in browser

Assuming you have a state called kitchen defined like this:

$stateProvider
  .state("kitchen", {
    url: "/kitchenUrl",
    ...
  });
 

Then accessing appdomain/kitchenUrl as the URL in your browser will go to your kitchen state, assuming that there are no nested states and appdomain is the server that hosts your application.

If you are still confused, here is a fully working Plnkr

Resolving data into a state

You can resolve data into your state when you transition into it, usually it's useful when the state needs to use that data, or to resolve into a state when some provided input needs to be authenticated.

When you define your states, you will need to provide a map of values to be resolved into the .resolve property, each resolved value should have a function that returns a promise

.state('main', {
     url: "/main",
     templateUrl: "path/to/main.html",
     controller: 'mainCtrl',
     resolve: {
         serverData: function ($http) {
             return $http.get('some/url');
         }
     }
});
 

Now, inside the mainCtrl you can access the data (that is if the $http call resolved successfully).

.controller("mainCtrl", function($scope, serverData) {
    $scope.resolvedData = serverData.then(resp=> resp.data);
    ....
})
 

Using transition events

UI-Router exposes transition events that can be helpful for handling transition errors, handling/blocking transitions based on certain parameter values, custom authentication etc..

These events can be bound to $rootScope for a global effect or to $scope for a per controller effect.


$stateChangeError - This event is broadcasted when an attempt to change the state has failed and threw and error, this event fires a callback function with the following signature:

callback(event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, error)

event: the event object

toState: the target state

toParams: the parameters passed to the target state

fromState: current state

fromParams: the parameters passed to the current state

error: the error object


$stateChangeStart - This event is broadcasted when a state transition started, this event fires a callback function with the following signature:

callback(event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, options)

options: the state options object

$stateChangeSuccess - This event is broadcasted when a state transition completes, this event fires a callback function with the following signature:

callback(event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, options)


$stateNotFound - This event is broadcasted when a state you requested to transition to was not found, this event fires a callback function with the following signature:

callback(event, unfoundState, fromParams, fromState)

unfoundState - an object representing the state that was not found


Example:

$rootScope.$on('$stateChangeSuccess', function (event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, options) {
    $log.debug("$stateChangeSuccess: event: %o toState: %o, toParams: %o, fromState: %o, fromParams: %o, options: %o", event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, options);
    // runs when the state has successfully changed
});

$rootScope.$on('$stateChangeStart', function (event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, options) {
    $log.debug("$stateChangeStart: event: %o toState: %o, toParams: %o, fromState: %o, fromParams: %o, options: %o", event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, options);
    // runs when the state has just started to transition
});

$rootScope.$on('$stateNotFound', function (event, unfoundState, fromParams, fromState) {
    $log.debug("$stateNotFound: event: %o unfoundState: %o, fromParams: %o, fromState: %o", event, unfoundState, fromParams, fromState);
    // runs when the state wsa not found
});

$rootScope.$on('$stateChangeError', function (event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, error) {
    $log.debug("$stateChangeError: event: %o toState: %o, toParams: %o, fromState: %o, fromParams: %o, error: %o", event, toState, toParams, fromState, fromParams, error);
    // runs when there was an error while attempting to transition
});
 

Stats

128 Contributors: 6
Sunday, November 20, 2016
Licensed under: CC-BY-SA

Not affiliated with Stack Overflow
Rip Tutorial: info@zzzprojects.com

Download eBook