Tutorial by Examples



Django is a web development framework based on Python. Django 1.11 (the latest stable release) requires Python 2.7, 3.4, 3.5 or 3.6 to be installed. Assuming pip is available, installation is as simple as running the following command. Keep in mind, omitting the version as shown below will install t...
django-admin is a command line tool that ships with Django. It comes with several useful commands for getting started with and managing a Django project. The command is the same as ./manage.py , with the difference that you don't need to be in the project directory. The DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE envir...
Step 1 If you already have Django installed, you can skip this step. pip install Django Step 2 Create a new project django-admin startproject hello That will create a folder named hello which will contain the following files: hello/ ├── hello/ │ ├── __init__.py │ ├── settings.py │...
Although not strictly required, it is highly recommended to start your project in a "virtual environment." A virtual environment is a container (a directory) that holds a specific version of Python and a set of modules (dependencies), and which does not interfere with the operating system'...
This example shows you a minimal way to create a Hello World page in Django. This will help you realize that the django-admin startproject example command basically creates a bunch of folders and files and that you don't necessarily need that structure to run your project. Create a file called ...
The default Django project template is fine but once you get to deploy your code and for example devops put their hands on the project things get messy. What you can do is separate your source code from the rest that is required to be in your repository. You can find a usable Django project templ...

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