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#include <stdio.h> /* increment: take number, increment it by one, and return it */ int increment(int i) { printf("increment %d by 1\n", i); return i + 1; } /* decrement: take number, decrement it by one, and return it */ int decrement(int i) { printf("...
#include <stdio.h> enum Op { ADD = '+', SUB = '-', }; /* add: add a and b, return result */ int add(int a, int b) { return a + b; } /* sub: subtract b from a, return result */ int sub(int a, int b) { return a - b; } /* getmath: return the appropriate m...
Using typedef It might be handy to use a typedef instead of declaring the function pointer each time by hand. The syntax for declaring a typedef for a function pointer is: typedef returnType (*name)(parameters); Example: Posit that we have a function, sort, that expects a function pointer to ...
Just like char and int, a function is a fundamental feature of C. As such, you can declare a pointer to one: which means that you can pass which function to call to another function to help it do its job. For example, if you had a graph() function that displayed a graph, you could pass which functio...
All C functions are in actuality pointers to a spot in the program memory where some code exists. The main use of a function pointer is to provide a "callback" to other functions (or to simulate classes and objects). The syntax of a function, as defined further down on this page is: retu...
Just like you can have a pointer to an int, char, float, array/string, struct, etc. - you can have a pointer to a function. Declaring the pointer takes the return value of the function, the name of the function, and the type of arguments/parameters it receives. Say you have the following function ...

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