React Router Routing with typed parameters


Example

import * as React from 'react';
import * as ReactDOM from 'react-dom';
import { Route, BrowserRouter as Router, Link, match } from 'react-router-dom';

// define React components for multiple pages
class Home extends React.Component<any, any> {
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <div>HOME</div>
        <div><Link to='/details/id123'>Goto Details</Link></div>
      </div>);
  }
}

interface DetailParams {
  id: string;
}

interface DetailsProps {
  required: string;
  match?: match<DetailParams>;
}

class Details extends React.Component<DetailsProps, any> {
  render() {
    const match = this.props.match;
    if (match) {
      return (
        <div>
          <div>Details for {match.params.id}</div>
          <Link to='/'>Goto Home</Link>
        </div>
      );
    } else {
      return (
        <div>
          <div>Error Will Robinson</div>
          <Link to='/'>Goto Home</Link>
        </div>
      )
    }
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(
  <Router>
    <div>
      <Route exact path="/" component={Home} />
      <Route exact path="/details/:id" component={(props) => <Details required="some string" {...props} />} />
    </div>
  </Router>

  , document.getElementById('root')
);

In order to preserve type safety for the Details component which has a required property named required, the <Route> definition defines an anonymous function-based component which composes a new component of type <Details> and specifying the required property.

The spread operator is utilized to re-apply the props passed to the anonymous function-based component onto the composed <Details> component.

The match property is defined as optional, since it's filled in dynamically by react-router, we, unfortunately, cannot define it as required property. This means a type guard is required when accessing the values later.