Tutorial by Examples: argv



Whenever a Python script is invoked from the command line, the user may supply additional command line arguments which will be passed on to the script. These arguments will be available to the programmer from the system variable sys.argv ("argv" is a traditional name used in most programmi...
def foobar(foo=None, bar=None): return "{}{}".format(foo, bar) values = {"foo": "foo", "bar": "bar"} foobar(**values) # "foobar"
process.argv is an array containing the command line arguments. The first element will be node, the second element will be the name of the JavaScript file. The next elements will be any additional command line arguments. Code Example: Output sum of all command line arguments index.js var sum = 0...
Command line arguments passed to awk are stored in the internal array ARGV of ARGC elements. The first element of the array is the program name. For example: awk 'BEGIN { for (i = 0; i < ARGC; ++i) { printf "ARGV[%d]=\"%s\"\n", i, ARGV[i] } }' arg1 arg2 arg3 ...
Command line arguments given for the script. The options for Ruby interpreter are already removed.
The first element of sys.argv[0] is the name of the python file being executed. The remaining elements are the script arguments. # script.py import sys print(sys.argv[0]) print(sys.argv) $ python script.py => script.py => ['script.py'] $ python script.py fizz => script.py ...
number1 = ARGV[0] number2 = ARGV[1] puts number1.to_i + number2.to_i ## run with: $ ruby a_plus_b.rb 1 2

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