Intel x86 Assembly Language & Microarchitecture Borland's Turbo Assembler - TASM


Example

Borland started out with a Pascal compiler that they called "Turbo Pascal". This was followed by compilers for other languages: C/C++, Prolog and Fortran. They also produced an assembler called "Turbo Assembler", which, following Microsoft's naming convention, they called "TASM".

TASM tried to fix some of the problems of writing code using MASM (see above), by providing a more strict interpretation of the source code under a specified IDEAL mode. By default it assumed MASM mode, so it could assemble MASM source directly - but then Borland found that they had to be bug-for-bug compatible with MASM's more "quirky" idiosyncracies - so they also added a QUIRKS mode.

Since TASM was (much) cheaper than MASM, it had a large user base - but not many people used IDEAL mode, despite its touted advantages.