atom-editor Basic Editing With Atom Interactive File Tree


Example

In order to keep track of your projects' file structure, Atom, like many text editors and IDEs, uses a file tree model. These trees show the locations and names of your files and directory. To toggle the tree between visible and hidden, the keys Ctrl+\ may be used (+\ for Mac OS). This tree also includes many operations for both files and directories as shown below:

Atom file tree options context menu

OperationDescription
Split UpSplits the editor into two panes with the selected file on the top
Split DownSplits the editor into two panes with the selected file on the bottom
Split LeftSplits the editor into two panes with the selected file on the left
Split RightSplits the editor into two panes with the selected file on the
Search in DirectoryOpens the find and replace tool to search the selected file or directory
New FileCreates a new file in the scope of the directory where the click occurred
New FolderCreates a new folder in the scope of the directory where the click occurred
RenameChanges the name of the file or directory
DuplicateCreates an exact copy of the file or directory
DeleteRemoves the file or directory
CopyCopies the file or directory to the clipboard
PastePastes a copied file or directory from the clipboard
Add Project FolderAllows you to select another directory to be included at the root of the tree
Copy Full PathCopies the full system path to the selected file or directory onto the clipboard
Copy Project PathCopies the path of the selected item relative to the project root to the clipboard
Open In New WindowOpens the file or directory as the root in a new window
Show in FinderOpens the default file explorer of the OS to the selected file or directory

Hidden files will (unless set otherwise in Atom's settings) show up with shaded filenames. A common example is GitHub's repository configuration data in the .git directory.