F# Add the "Business Logic"


Example

Presumably, your program will do something. Add your working code to the project in place of Program.fs. In this case, our task is to draw spirograph curves on a Window Canvas. This is accomplished using Spirograph.fs, below.

namespace Spirograph

// open System.Windows does not automatically open all its sub-modules, so we 
// have to open them explicitly as below, to get the resources noted for each.
open System                             // for Math.PI
open System.Windows                     // for Point
open System.Windows.Controls            // for Canvas
open System.Windows.Shapes              // for Ellipse
open System.Windows.Media               // for Brushes

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
// This file is first in the build sequence, so types should be defined here
type DialogBoxXaml  = FsXaml.XAML<"DialogBox.xaml">
type MainWindowXaml = FsXaml.XAML<"MainWindow.xaml">
type App            = FsXaml.XAML<"App.xaml"> 

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Model: This draws the Spirograph
type MColor = | MBlue   | MRed | MRandom

type Model() =
  let mutable myCanvas: Canvas = null
  let mutable myR              = 220    // outer circle radius
  let mutable myr              = 65     // inner circle radius
  let mutable myl              = 0.8    // pen position relative to inner circle
  let mutable myColor          = MBlue  // pen color
  
  let rng                      = new Random()
  let mutable myRandomColor    = Color.FromRgb(rng.Next(0, 255) |> byte,
                                               rng.Next(0, 255) |> byte,
                                               rng.Next(0, 255) |> byte)

  member this.MyCanvas
    with get() = myCanvas
    and  set(newCanvas) = myCanvas <- newCanvas

  member this.MyR
    with get() = myR
    and  set(newR) = myR <- newR

  member this.Myr
    with get() = myr
    and  set(newr) = myr <- newr

  member this.Myl
    with get() = myl
    and  set(newl) = myl <- newl

  member this.MyColor
    with get() = myColor
    and  set(newColor) = myColor <- newColor

  member this.Randomize =
    // Here we randomize the parameters. You can play with the possible ranges of
    // the parameters to find randomized spirographs that are pleasing to you.
    this.MyR      <- rng.Next(100, 500)
    this.Myr      <- rng.Next(this.MyR / 10, (9 * this.MyR) / 10)
    this.Myl      <- 0.1 + 0.8 * rng.NextDouble()
    this.MyColor  <- MRandom
    myRandomColor <- Color.FromRgb(rng.Next(0, 255) |> byte,
                                   rng.Next(0, 255) |> byte,
                                   rng.Next(0, 255) |> byte)

  member this.DrawSpirograph =
    // Draw a spirograph. Note there is some fussing with ints and floats; this 
    // is required because the outer and inner circle radii are integers. This is
    // necessary in order for the spirograph to return to its starting point 
    // after a certain number of revolutions of the outer circle.
    
    // Start with usual recursive gcd function and determine the gcd of the inner
    // and outer circle radii. Everything here should be in integers.
    let rec gcd x y =
        if y = 0 then x
        else gcd y (x % y)
  
    let g = gcd this.MyR this.Myr             // find greatest common divisor
    let maxRev = this.Myr / g                 // maximum revs to repeat

    // Determine width and height of window, location of center point, scaling 
    // factor so that spirograph fits within the window, ratio of inner and outer
    // radii.
    
    // Everything from this point down should be float.
    let width, height = myCanvas.ActualWidth, myCanvas.ActualHeight
    let cx, cy = width / 2.0, height / 2.0    // coordinates of center point
    let maxR   = min cx cy                    // maximum radius of outer circle
    let scale  = maxR / float(this.MyR)             // scaling factor
    let rRatio = float(this.Myr) / float(this.MyR)  // ratio of the radii

    // Build the collection of spirograph points, scaled to the window.
    let points = new PointCollection()
    for degrees in [0 .. 5 .. 360 * maxRev] do
      let angle = float(degrees) * Math.PI / 180.0
      let x, y = cx + scale * float(this.MyR) *
                 ((1.0-rRatio)*Math.Cos(angle) +
                  this.Myl*rRatio*Math.Cos((1.0-rRatio)*angle/rRatio)),
                 cy + scale * float(this.MyR) *
                 ((1.0-rRatio)*Math.Sin(angle) - 
                  this.Myl*rRatio*Math.Sin((1.0-rRatio)*angle/rRatio))
      points.Add(new Point(x, y))
  
    // Create the Polyline with the above PointCollection, erase the Canvas, and 
    // add the Polyline to the Canvas Children
    let brush = match this.MyColor with
                | MBlue   -> Brushes.Blue
                | MRed    -> Brushes.Red
                | MRandom -> new SolidColorBrush(myRandomColor)
  
    let mySpirograph = new Polyline()
    mySpirograph.Points <- points
    mySpirograph.Stroke <- brush

    myCanvas.Children.Clear()
    this.MyCanvas.Children.Add(mySpirograph) |> ignore

Spirograph.fs is the first F# file in the compilation order, so it contains the definitions of the types we will need. Its job is to draw a spirograph on the main window Canvas based on parameters entered in a dialog box. Since there are lots of references on how to draw a spirograph, we won't go into that here.