Tutorial by Topics: key



Keywords are predefined, reserved identifiers with special meaning to the compiler. They cannot be used as identifiers in your program without the @ prefix. For example @if is a legal identifier but not the keyword if.

When you use the yield keyword in a statement, you indicate that the method, operator, or get accessor in which it appears is an iterator. Using yield to define an iterator removes the need for an explicit extra class (the class that holds the state for an enumeration) when you implement the IEnumerable and IEnumerator pattern for a custom collection type.

Certain words - so-called keywords - are treated specially in JavaScript. There's a plethora of different kinds of keywords, and they have changed in different versions of the language.

Well-designed classes encapsulate their functionality, hiding their implementation while providing a clean, documented interface. This allows redesign or change so long as the interface is unchanged.

In a more complex scenario, multiple classes that rely on each others' implementation details may be required. Friend classes and functions allow these peers access to each others' details, without compromising the encapsulation and information hiding of the documented interface.

Updating Vim key mappings allows you to solve two kinds of problems: Re-assigning key commands to letters that are more memorable or accessible, and creating key commands for functions which have none. Here you will learn about the various ways to [re]map key commands, and the context to which they apply (i.e. vim modes)


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