C Language Using #define


Example

C of all versions, will effectively treat any integer value other than 0 as true for comparison operators and the integer value 0 as false. If you don't have _Bool or bool as of C99 available, you could simulate a Boolean data type in C using #define macros, and you might still find such things in legacy code.

#include <stdio.h>

#define bool int
#define true 1
#define false 0

int main(void) {
    bool x = true;  /* Equivalent to int x = 1; */
    bool y = false; /* Equivalent to int y = 0; */
    if (x) /* Functionally equivalent to if (x != 0) or if (x != false) */
    {
        puts("This will print!");
    }
    if (!y) /* Functionally equivalent to if (y == 0) or if (y == false) */
    {
        puts("This will also print!");
    }
}

Don't introduce this in new code since the definition of these macros might clash with modern uses of <stdbool.h>.