C# Break and Continue Statements


Break Statement

A break statement can be included in any kind of loop to immediately terminate the loop when a test condition is met. The break ensures no further iterations of that loop will be executed.

  • When the break statement is executed, it immediately terminates the loop and transfers the program control to the next statement after the loop.
  • It can also be used to terminate a case in the switch statement.
  • If the break statement is used inside nested loops, then it terminates only those loops which contain the break statement.

Example

In the following example, the conditional statement contains a counter that is supposed to count from 0 to 10; however, the break statement terminates the loop after i is equal to 5.

for (int i = 0; i <= 10; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Counter: {0}", i);

    if (i == 5)
        break;
}

Let's run the above code and it will print the following output on the console window.

Counter: 0
Counter: 1
Counter: 2
Counter: 3
Counter: 4
Counter: 5

Let's consider the following example of a break statement inside the switch statement.

int caseSwitch = 1;

switch (caseSwitch)
{
    case 1:
        Console.WriteLine("Case 1");
        break;
    case 2:
        Console.WriteLine("Case 2");
        break;
    default:
        Console.WriteLine("Default case");
        break;
}

Let's run the above code and it will print the following output on the console window.

Case 1

Continue Statement

A continue statement can be included in any kind of loop to immediately terminate that particular iteration of the loop when a test condition is met.

  • The continue statement allows the loop to proceed to the next iteration.
  • It stops the current iteration of the inner loop, without terminating the loop.

Example

In the following example, a counter is initialized to count from 0 to 10. The continue statement is executed when the boolean expression (i > 3 && i < 8) is true.

for (int i = 0; i <= 10; i++)
{
    if (i > 3 && i < 8)
        continue;

    Console.WriteLine("Counter: {0}", i);
}

The statements inside the for-loop after the continue statement are skipped in the iterations where i is greater than 3 and i is less than 8.

Let's run the above code and it will print the following output on the console window.

Counter: 0
Counter: 1
Counter: 2
Counter: 3
Counter: 8
Counter: 9
Counter: 10

All the examples related to the break and continue statements are available in the BreakStatement.cs and ContinueStatement.cs files respectively of the source code. Download the source code and try out all the examples for better understandings.